Department of Corrections and Community Supervision

Correction Officer to retire after 50 years of service

Acting Commissioner Anthony J. Annucci (R) thanks and congratulates Correction Officer Noel Morris

Acting Commissioner Anthony J. Annucci (R) thanks and congratulates Correction Officer Noel Morris for 50 years of stellar service to the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision

Fellow officers, employees, and incarcerated individuals at Sing Sing will soon feel a void.

That's because Correction Officer Noel Morris, a constant presence at Sing Sing for the past 50 years, will retire in July. On June 13, during a special ceremony in recognition of his outstanding service, Acting Commissioner Anthony J. Annucci presented Officer Morris with his retirement shield, a letter of commendation, and a Commissioner's coin.

What makes Officer Morris' retirement so noteworthy is he has worked in the same position at Sing Sing for the past five decades.

"It is altogether astonishing and awe-inspiring for a Department employee to have actually worked for 50 years before choosing to retire," Acting Commissioner Annucci said. "But to have done so in the same position for that entire period and at the same correctional facility is unprecedented and worthy of commendation."

In his position, Officer Morris served as an original member of the Correction Emergency Response Team established in the late 1970s. Certified in Advanced Correction Emergency Response Tactics and trained in Confined Space, he skillfully provided support during the 1983 House B Block riot at Sing Sing while manning the Mess Hall where CERT and hostage negotiators worked to free 16 hostages.

Officer Morris also completed intense training as a firefighter and, for the past 34 years, was Sing Sing's fire and safety officer. In that capacity, he responded promptly to preserve life and property during fires, as well as ably attended to employees who were injured on the job. Because of his training and expertise, he was keenly aware of a threat to an incarcerated individual and took prompt action. As a result, he thwarted the attempt to drop a 75-pound weight on another incarcerated individual's chest, ultimately saving the inmate's life.

But his commitment to serving others isn't limited to the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision. The Bronx native has also served his community as a Civil Defense Auxiliary Fireman.

During retirement, Officer Morris will have more time to spend on one of his greatest pastimes: restoring vintage muscle cars and traveling throughout the nation showcasing them.

He will also get to enjoy more quality time with his wife, Mary; three children, Michael, Karren and Noel; and seven grandchildren, Alex, Cameron, Dominque, Cassidy, Jordan, Cole and Devin.